Vulnerabilities on the decline, but risk assessment is often flawed, study says

The number of vulnerabilities could reach a three-year low in 2014, but correctly assessing their risk can be hard, IBM researchers said

August 27, 2014, 3:03 PM — Based on data gathered over the first six months of 2014, security researchers from IBM X-Force predict that the number of publicly reported vulnerabilities will drop to under 8,000 this year, a first since 2011.

While the majority of flaws disclosed so far fall into the medium-risk category, the IBM researchers said that the widely used system to rate their severity often fails to reflect the real risk they pose to users.

Over the first half of the year, the IBM X-Force team collected reports about 3,900 security vulnerabilities from advisories published by software vendors, security industry mailing lists and other sources. If vulnerability disclosures continue at the same rate, the number of flaws reported in 2014 will fall under 8,000, several hundred less than in each of the previous two years, the team said in a report released this week.

"It is difficult to point to any one factor that has contributed to the decline in the number of vulnerability disclosures in 2014," the X-Force researchers said. "However, it is interesting to note that the total number of vendors disclosing vulnerabilities has decreased year over year (1,602 vendors in 2013, compared to 926 vendors in 2014)."

Security experts have argued in the past that the overall number of vulnerabilities is not as relevant as their impact. However, despite attempts to standardize methods of assessing the severity of vulnerabilities, like the Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS), there are many cases where the true risk posed by certain flaws is not represented accurately.

"Many in the industry, including security analysts, corporate incident response teams and enterprise software consumers, have become dissatisfied with scoring inconsistencies that often occur across different organizations," the X-Force researchers said. "Sometimes the inconsistencies are the result of the subjectivity that can go into how an individual or organization scores vulnerabilities, but they can also result from some of the inherent flaws in the current CVSS standard and a lack of clear guidelines on how to objectively assess certain types of vulnerabilities."

One prime example is the Heartbleed flaw disclosed in the OpenSSL library in early April that can be exploited by attackers to extract sensitive information from the memory of Web servers. The vulnerability received a CVSS base score of 5.0 out of 10, which puts it into the medium-risk category.

via Vulnerabilities on the decline, but risk assessment is often flawed, study says | ITworld.

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